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Globally Inclusive Teaching Resources

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PEDAGOGICAL DESIGN
Globally Inclusive Teaching Resources

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Author :
Makena Neal
Globally Inclusive Teaching Resources

MN Contact profile image
Author :
Makena Neal

Greetings Educators!

Are you, do you, or have you ever - crossed paths with an international student or colleague at MSU? It is highly unlikely that your answer to these prompts would be "no" given the following information provided by the Office for International Students and Scholars (OISS):

Since admitting its first international students in 1873, MSU has welcomed tens of thousands of international students and scholars to East Lansing. Today, MSU is home to over 9,000 international students, scholars, and their dependent family members from more than 140 countries. In addition to contributing to the academic and intercultural environment, international students also have a tremendous positive economic impact on the Greater Lansing area. Michigan State University's international students contribute $324.5 million to the local economy through spending on education, housing, dining, retail, transportation, telecommunications, and health care. This economic impact supports 4,675 jobs in the Greater Lansing area. 
Source: NAFSA International Student Economic Value Tool

Given the significant presence of international students and scholars and the depth of contributions they make in the Spartan community, it is crucial that you consider diversity, equity, and inclusion from a global perspective. For starters, check out the Michigan State University's own: James M. Lucas, Nicola Imbracsio, and Sheila Marquardt have shared an excellent resource on Global Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for educators entitled "Global DEI Models and Methods" (2021). You can access the PDF of this resource on iteach.msu.edu. You should also visit the Global and Intercultural Learning at MSU page for more information about internationalizing undergraduate experiences. To learn more about this topic, review the "Internationalizing the Student Experience: Working Group Report."

You should also consider varying degrees of familiarity with spoken and written english. Every learner is unique in their exposure to and experience with english. For a guided asynchronous experience to help you think more on this topic, explore the "Teaching Multilingual Learners: An Introduction to Translingual Pedagogy" playlist! An additional resources is "Seven Tips Toward Linguistic Inclusion". Both of these resources were shared directly by other educators at MSU. Another MSU resource for linguistic inclusion is the English Language Center. You should, at a minimum, be aware of the services and programs they provide!

More broadly speaking, there are other resources to help you think about inclusive teaching. A great place to start is MSU Libraries' Inclusive Teaching page. In partnership with the Office of the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and the Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives, MSU librarians have developed this site to highlight research and resources focusing on inclusive teaching in the disciplines. The site is a work in progress. Librarians have begun gathering resources by carrying out preliminary searches in their subject areas and summarizing their findings and search processes. These lists are meant to serve as a starting point for faculty interested in looking into research on pedagogy and inclusion in their fields. 

A breadth of very insighful reasources (relevant to all) are shared in the "Trauma Informed Practice: Resources for Best Practices in the Classroom" article and site. Similarly, an important centeralized resource for all is MSU's Institutional Diversity and Inclusion office, that has developed a great foundational set of resources for Building Inclusive Communities. Some of these resources are also represented, along side many others, in the "Inclusive Teaching and Pedagogy" section of the "Expanded Educator Resources" playlist.

Making big changes to your practice can seem overwhleming, but working toward a globally inclusive classroom is critical for the culture of MSU broadly and student success as a whole. You can take small steps to shifting the way you think about the design of your assignments (time based deadlines might not be that inclusive for individuals in time zones other than Eastern), your activities (whose perspectives are represented on your reading list), or even the your very first encounter with learners (a name is often core to one's identity, so correctly naming people is important [visit NameDrop for a free platform where anyone can share the correct pronunciation of their name])!

Who will be globally inclusive in their teaching? Spartans will.


Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash

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Makena Neal #iteachmsu
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